The Metropolitan Council of Churches restructured again in 1967, becoming the Metropolitan Inter-Church Agency, or, “MICA.” The decision to disband was made on May 21st and MICA began operations on July 1st.[1] The reform was part of an effort to open the agency to Catholic and Jewish denominations and judicatories. In the past, the Metropolitan Council of Churches consisted primarily of various Protestant denominations. It eventually began to collaborate with the Roman Catholics of the Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese and the Kansas City, Kansas Archdiocese. Membership even extended to include several conservative Evangelical groups, and Protestants, who had previously been excluded.[2] Initial membership included Episcopal, Roman Catholic, National Baptist, American Baptist, Southern Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, Christian Methodist Episcopal, Mennonite, Reformed Latter-Day Saints, United Church of Christ, and the Church of God. [3]

Structurally, each judicatory was represented by two members who participated in the agencies’ cabinet. Operations were governed by executive secretaries and their corresponding office force. Various task forces addressed problems were addressed on an ad hoc basis. Task forces included “Faith and Order,”[4]  “Women’s Rights,” and the “Kansas City Worlds of Fun Ministry.” In February of 1973, The Metropolitan Inter-Church Agency (MICA), was located at 4049 Pennsylvania Ave., KCMO 64111, and the Executive Director was Jim Leffingwell.[5] In 1979, the organization dissolved due to political conflicts. The emergence of right-wing Christian groups, such as Focus on the Family and the Christian Coalition, and increasing conservatism in Catholicism, contributed to the dissatisfaction of some members and led to the dissolution of MICA.[6]

 


References 

[1] The Living Church. “Ecumenical Social Agency.” The Living Church, 18 June 1967.

[2] The Catholic Reporter. “U.S. Catholic Ecumenism Ten Years Later.” The Catholic Reporter, 1975.

[3] The Living Church. “Ecumenical Social Agency.” The Living Church, 18 June 1967.

[4] The Catholic Reporter. “U.S. Catholic Ecumenism Ten Years Later.” The Catholic Reporter, 1975.

[5] Metropolitan Inter-Church Agency. K.C. Community Calendar. Kansas City: Metropolitan Inter-Church Agency, February 1973.

[6] Guillot, Lawrence, interview by Geneva Blackmer. 2016. Interfaith History in Kansas City (February 15).